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on our planet tell us about the likelihood that alien civilizations exist? in the second of a two-part series, we will ask one of the originators of the dark matter theory, dr. joel primack and nancy ellen abrahams. if. for such a small if i live to a hundred. if social security isn't enough. if my heart gets broken. if she says yes. we believe if should never hold you back. if should be managed with a plan that builds on what you already have. together we can create a personal safy net, a launching pad, for all those brilliant ifs in the middle of life. you can call on our expertise and get guarantees for the if in life. after all, we're metlife. >>> this is the second session with two extraordinary people, nancy abrahams wosay lawyer, a song writer, a spouse, and the coauthor of this volume, which is quite breathtaking. the view from the center of the universe. discovering our extraordinariy place in the cosmows. a new book. -- cosmos. highly placed and the coauthor is sitting right here, his name is joel preand he is one of the world's most successful and recognized cosmonthlyg
to assassinate the saudi arabian ambassador to the u.s. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the clandestine operation and the administration's push to punish iran with new sanctions. >> brown: then, we examine the economic and social fall-out from alabama's tough new immigration law. >> woodruff: margaret warner reports on the visit of south korea's president lee as he and president obama celebrate a new trade deal and consider how to rein in north korea's nuclear ambitions. >> with north korea you never have a good option. the worse options is to leave them alone and to let their nuclear missile program go completely unabated for four years of obama. >> brown: ray suarez explores fascinating new research on the genetic makeup of the bubonic plague that killed millions of europeans in the middle ages. >> woodruff: and tom clarke of i.t.n. reports from the remote highlands of colombia, where half the population will inherit early onset alzheimers disease. >> these families' plight has come to attention of the ou
evening and thanks for joining us. google shares take flight after hours, jumping over $30 a share, susie, after the web giant crushed analyst estimates with its latest earnings. >> susie: tom, profits surged 26% and revenues posted anve bigger in. here's how the numbers stacked up. google earned $2.7 billion, or $9.72 a share, almost a dollar ahead of analyst's estimates. revenues were also better than expected, up 33% to $7.5 billion. >> tom: joining us with more-- scott kessler. he follows google as senior director of technology research at s&p capital iq. with us tonight in new york. scott, how do you describe these quarterly results from google, blew estimates out of the water. >> yeah, tom, i would say having covered the stock for more than seven years, probably between good and great. google over the years has really delivered time and time again. this quarter was no exception. what was surprising to us was the combination of accelerating revenue growth for the fourth straight quarter as well as continuing improvement in margins reflecting well controlled costs and expenses. that's
put out about us on those web sites. sometimes if you look at the what the kids are doing with space books they are loading personal information on web sites. all that depends. we need to understand there are central repositories that have this information. >> let's talk about this i ntelius, do i have that correctly? does it examine every public record on a person for a fee whether it's local government or federal government or state government? >> it's one of many companies that their business is going to all those public records, which were created by taxpayers by the way, putting the information in their own private companies and -- computers and selling it. >> this is what i have that they'll deliver for you for $29.95 or if you want a full write up for $49.95. it will give you up to ten prior addresses and phone numbers for the individual, a maiden name, the age, the current name, the relatives, the roommates, the neighbors -- that's the beginning dossier. ifif you go further to the largr one you can examine thousands of private records including any criminal records, any arres
but over, and pledged to pull out u.s. forces by the end of this year. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> woodruff: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we excerpt the president's remarks; and margaret warner talks with white house deputy national security advisor denis mcdonough about the coming draw-down . >> woodruff: then, we ask libya's ambassador to the u.s., ali suleiman aujali, about the questions surrounding moammar qaddafi's death and what's next for his country. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: and paul solman talks to author michael lewis about his new book, a travelogue of sorts about nations hit hard by the financial crisis. >> all these different societies were faced with exactly the same temptation-- free money. they behaved radically differently from one another. why? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it'
the stock. >> tom: then, talking tough on trade to boost the u.s. economy. >> i want to see fair trade policies, and if they're not going to be fair, you cut it off or you tax the hell out of them. >> tom: coming up, our interview with real estate mogul donald trump. it's "nightly business report" for ursday, october 20. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everybody. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by suzanne pratt in new york. it's solid sales for microsoft in the company's most recent quarter. >> suzanne: tom, firms are buying microsoft's office and server software, and that business offset weak consumer demand for p.c.s. microsoft earned 68 cents a share in its fiscal first quarter, in line with wall street forecasts. revenues, however, were a bit better than expected, coming in at $17.3 billion. >> tom: microsoft shares traded slightly lower after
and the corporation for public broadcasting. >>> welcome. i'm sitting in for bob agger nethy. thank you for joining us. a federal judge upheld most of alabama's controversial immigration law. they ruled police officers can be required to check the immigration status of anyone they suspect is in the country illegally. public schools must check the status of students. the part of the law opposed most vigorously by many religion groups was struck down. christian clergy outlawed transporting or harboring illegal immigrants and prevented them from minstering to certain people. the judge's decision is expected to be appealed by both sides. >>> an american-born radical preacher was killed in yemen by an air strike this week. officials considered him a major terror threat to the united states. his anti-american sermons inspired several plots against the u.s. ethicists and religion voices raised questions about whether the killing violated law or denied his right to due process. on our website we have a segment on the ethical issues raised by the use of drones. the council considered the palestinian request fo
to have you with us. as the occupy wall street movement spreads around the world, religious leaders continue to play a role in the demonstrations. in london, st. paul's ka ahead at yal ral shut down for the first time since world war ii about the growing protester who is set up camp on the church's grounds. they worried their presence was a safety hazard. here in the u.s., more than 200 clergy signed a petition calling for economic justice and offering spiritual support to the protesters. while jewish groups have been part of the protest, the anti-defamation league condemned what it said has been anti-semitic signs at some of the demonstrations. religion continues to play a prominent and controversial role this presidential campaign season and came up in the republican presidential candidate debate in las vegas we have a report. >> mitt romney said candidates should not be selected on the basis of faith. >> that are idea that we should choose people based on religion for public office is what i find most troubling because the founders of the country went to great length to make sure
the area. they're using heavy machinery to search for people trapped inside collapsed buildings. turkey's home sector says along with the dead, i quake injured about 1,300 others. the tremors were strongest in the eastern province of van. [ speaking foreign language ] >> some survivors are taking shelter in tents. support crews are handing out food and other sulies. the earthquake cut off communications in the area. the number of dead could rise as more reports come in. >>> a japanese expert who studied building safety in the country says he found that in most cases, walls are made of brick. and structural columns are too thin that this makes them vulnerable to shaking. the expert says such buildings collapse easily in the event of large quakes. japan's government expressed condolences to the victims and their families, and says it is preparing to support the country as much as it can. >>> in thailand, central bangkok has flooded again, forcing the closure of nearby roads. ed chao phraya river overflowed on monday, along several hundred meters of its banks, streets are under about 50 ce
in washington using terrorists from mexico. we talked with f.b.i. official john miller and author roya hakakian. >> there were the rivalries between iran and saudi arabia have only become more and more pronounced since the arab spring and since the growing of the tensions between iran and saudi arabia. >> charlie: we colude this evening with a conversation about chinese aunt pureship wang boming president of the stock exchange and executive council and the two partners. >> we solve our problems with the history of china and converse form relations from -- electricity and car. now the two countries work together in a way to get the maximum geration of products to solve the problem we are facing. i think we have this opportunity and also obligation. >> charlie: wall street protests, accusations against iranian officials and chinese entrepreneurship when we continue. >> every story needs a hero we can all root for, who beats the odds and comes out on top. that this isn't just a hollywood story line,t's happening every day all across america. every time a storefront opens or the mnight oil is bur
deals, and they're all about boosting u.s. jobs. >> and this jobs bill, mr. speaker, does not require a tax increase. this jobs bill does not require us to go into debt. and this jobs bill has bipartisian support. >> tom: from boosting jobs through trade to losing jobs on wall street, we look at what job cuts in the world of finance could mean for the u.s. economy. it's "nightly business report" for wednesday, october 12. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. high hopes on wall street today. u.s. investors bought up stocks after european officials rolled out what's seen as the most credible plan so far to prop up european banks. tom? >> tom: susie, the plan was rolled out today by the president of the european commission, jose manuel barrosa. he called on european leaders to act quickly and agree at a meeting in two weeks. here's what he's calling for. europea
money or your life," you choose to hand your money over. >> tom: and back in the u.s., the economy does more than limp along, taking the threat of recession off the table for now. >> the message is that the economy is still recovering. it's a slow growth recovery, it's a bumpy one, but the recovery is ongoing. >> tom: it's "nightly business report" for thursday, october 27. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib remains on assignment. we have good news from both sides of the atlantic ocean today, pushing major stock indices into positive territory for the year. it was a big day of buying for shareholders. the dow rocketed up 339 points to close above 12,000 for the first time since early august. the nasdaq shot up almost 88 points. the s&p 500 rallied more than 42 points. big board volume spiked to just under 1.5 billion sha
lows for the year on growing concerns about the u.s. and global economies. >> our markets are so fragile, the littlest thing really moves our markets in a negative way. >> tom: from bankruptcy rumors swirling around american airlines to fresh lows for bank of america investors. it's "nightly business report" for monday, october 3. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business port" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. a grisly start to the fourth quarter on wall street. the major averages tumbled today as much as 3%, moving stocks closer to bear market territory, tom. >> tom: susie, investors were startled by news that greece will miss deficit reduction targets it agreed to as part of its bailout deal. concerns about europe continue to impact trading here in the u.s. at the bell, the dow plunged 258 points. the nasdaq lost almost 80 and the s&p fell 32. trading volume starts the week on the heavy side. 1.4
drones are used to target terrorists. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks to anita hill about her new book on race and gender, 20 years after she accused then-supreme court nominee clarence thomas of sexual harassment. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on >> if i can symbolize the ability to pursue gender equality, racial equality and to be truthful about our experiences, then absolutely that's what i want to be. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in tru
: good evening everyone. my colleague tom hudson is on assignment tonight. europe and the u.s. economy-- those troublesome issues pressured stocks today. there were conflicting signals today on how close european leaders are on a deal to solve the debt crisis ahead of a crucial summit this weekend. investors are concerned that talks between france and germany have stalled. and in greece, one of the largest demonstrations as people protested a new batch of austerity measures. the greek parliament takes a final vote on the plan tomorrow. also worrying investors? a pessimistic report on the u.s. economy from the federal reserve. its beige book survey of regional economies showed weaker conditions for growth. all that led to a negative close on wall street. the dow lost 72 points, the nasdaq dropped 53 and the s&p slipped 15. earlier in the day, averages were solidly in positive territory. as suzanne pratt reports, today's volatility is a pattern of trading that will be with us for a while. >> reporter: one day we're up. one day we're down. with the u.s. stock market experiencing such wild
posted impressive gains in october, but november could also be a key month for the markets. the u.s. economy and the european financial situation will continue to be watched closely. and don't forget, a third of the firms in the s&p 500 still have to report third-quarter results. so far this earnings season, the message from corporate america has been pretty encouraging. >> as we've gotten through this earnings season-- the third quarter reporting season-- we are still seeing 70% of companies beating expectations-- about 16% year-over-year-growth. in terms of profits, it's still very, very strong. >> reporter: many strategists predict stocks could gain 5% to 10% by the end of the year. the big caveat is what happens in europe. >> it's kind of like groundhog day, where we wake up to the same movie over and over again-- the same situation. i think this europe situation is going to come back. i think it is going to plague us again. >> reporter: so although there could be more goodies in store for stocks the next few months, it's clear the market's goblins haven't entirely disappeared.
a plot to assassinate the saudi arabian ambassador to the u.s., a scheme that they said was conceived of and sponsored by the iranian government. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the charges and the alleged conspiracy. >> ifill: then we look at opening day in the trial of the so-called underwear bomber, who tried to bring down a u.s. airliner on christmas day 2009. >> brown: we debate the merits of president obama's jobs bill with two senators: michigan democrat carl levin and georgia republican johnny isakson. >> ifill: john merrow examines the dilemma faced by a pennsylvania school system that spent big on a state-of-the-art facility. >> reporter: the economic crisis hit. like rural school districts all across the country, this school had to put its ambitious dreams on hold almost overnight. the challenge became to make ends meet. >> brown: and ray suarez talks to a 94-year-old former french resistance fighter who urges young people to take to the streets and show their outrage. >> ifill: that's all ahead on
sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. the u.s. job market is perking up: american businesses added more than 100,000 jobs in september. tom, that was much better than feared given all the talk about recession. >> tom: but susie, it's still going to take more than that to power up the stalled u.s. economy. the labor department said payrolls grew by 103,000 and the unemployment rate is still stuck at 9.1%. it turns out this summer may not have been quite so bad for jobs are originally thought. the government now says 57,000 jobs were created in august. zero was reported previously. >> susie: as good as all that sounds. some experts say it's not enough to keep the u.s. out of recession. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 103,000 new jobs in one month is an okay number. but, it falls way short for the millions of unemployed. sure several industries hired people in september, including retail, construction and health care. the problem is the economy needs to add more like a quarter million new jobs a month for many months, before the unemployment rate can fall sharply. economist
to technology and the know how to use it, the more they can participate in the country's booming economy which would get a $1 billion stimulus for the world cup and olympics. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown assesses the state of the banking industry, as some of the largest financial institutions report growing losses. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences, tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow, starts today. ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was mad
's first multi-faith school of theology. >> sock of us are looking in a jewish direction. some of us are looking in a muslim direction. some are looking into n a christian direction and yet we're all looking in a god direction. >> woodruff: plus, different screens for different kids. we look at the "app gap" among the nation's children. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial l
in syria force the u.s. to withdraw its ambassador. >> woodruff: margaret warner examines new tensions in the u.s. pakistan relationship. >> i think the obama administration understands that the relationship with pakistan spiraling out of control will jeopardize their ability to leave afghanistan. >> ifill: we look at the administration's plan to jumpstart the ailing housing industry, as president obama visits nevada, the state hit hardest by foreclosures. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks with the irish nobel laureate known as "famous seamus" about his newest collection of poems and his life's work. >> i began to write poems about my parents, kind of elegaic poems connecting up with previous generations, so that was partly human chain. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experienc
the mark. alcoa c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld joins us with an update. it's "nightly business report" for tuesday, october 11. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. a bad start to earnings season-- late today, alcoa posted a skimpy profit that was much lower than expected. the aluminum giant is the first dow component to report and, susie, investors are worried that this a is bad omen for upcoming quarterly results. >> susie: tom, investors were disappointed-- alcoa reported right after the closing bell, and the stock fell more than 3.5% following the earnings release. here's why-- the company earned 15 cents a share in the third quarter, up from a year ago, but seven cents below analysts' estimates. alcoa blamed it on a big drop in aluminum prices and slow economic growth. revenues came in slightly ahead of estimates, up 21% to $6.4 billion. joi
problems of the u.s. are deeper and structural. >> there's no doubt whatever term you use china does manipulate or manage its currency and there are both economic and politic reasons for doing that. obviously they want to support exports which, you know, which are mainly private companies or foreign-invested companys which are the greatest source of job growth in cha which, you know, helps keep the country stable. but tre's al a political imperive in a way. anormal sort of calibration of the strength of chinese export, the currey could be 20% to 40%. but if you had in china an open capital account and the freely floating currency godnows what would happen because the financial system is not stable, money could flee the country as much as come into it. and you could see a collapse in the currency as you might see an appreciation of it. so i think china is quite unstable without strong controls and so it's not ju an attempt to get an economic advantage. i think it's a way that... it's one of the element it is communist party uses to manage the economy and then stay in power. >> liu: an
job prospects and heavy debt loads. u.s. student loan debt could top $1 trillion this year, over taking credit card debt. with so much money at stake, the occupy wall street movement is pushing the idea of debt forgiveness for students. darren gersh looks at whether that idea could really boost the economy. >> reporter: kelly mears says his high school counselors and everyone else in the student loan system told him not to worry about the debt he was taking on. >> they told me to dig my grave, essentially, and you know, really. >> reporter: like many of the students in the occupy wall street movement, mears hasn't been able to find a job, and now he and many other protesters are pressing for relief on their student loans. >> i think interest should be forgiven, at the very least. i would like to see student loan debt forgiven, i think it would actually be a huge economic boost. and for our generation-- a whole generation of people it would re-empower them. >> reporter: but analysts say that empowerment would be expensive. >> i'm sure we all feel that we deserve forgiveness. >> r
was for all of us. >> rose: what was his passion? >> when i spent time with steve he talked a lot about solving end user problems, solve computer problems but doing it in an artistic way. he saw beauty as a part of everything he did. if you look at his history, he viously was involved with pixar and movies and so forth. he cared a lot about how the average person, the average human around the world consumed things. was it beautiful, was it artistic, was it clever. if you look at the apple stores and the art there, over and over again he is a combination of technology and artists. an analogy would be from history would michelangelo who did both. there were very, few such people in history. >> rose: it is often said about him that he understood design better than anybody else. and in saying that, some people did not recognize that he understood techlogy. you are a technologist. you are formally a chief technology officer at sun miosystems and have d a distinguished career and came out of that kind of academic background. steve had a different academic background but most people in technol
with us. president obama met with top leaders of the national association of evangelicals this week at the white house. >> it was the first time the president met with the group. among the topics discussed, religious freedom abroad, jobs here at home and cuts to the federal budget. the nae has urged lawmakers not to reduce foreign aid or domestic programs that serve the poor. >> meanwhile, outside a d.c. courthouse, other religious leaders held a prayer vigil opposing budget cuts to anti-poverty programs. >> 11 members of the religious group were facing misdemeanor charges for "intention to disrupt congress" during a prayer vigil at the capitol last july. those charges were dropped after the leaders agreed not to enter the capitol for 6 months and to submit to drug testing. >>> as the occupy wall street protests continue, there is now a noticeable religious presence at the mass gatherings. sukkahs, the temporary structures built to mark the jewish holiday of sukkot, were constructed at some of the protest sites. earlier, prayer services were held for yom kippur. an interfaith group
viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. susie gharib remains on assignment tonight. some mixed news on the economy today. let's start with the good news. consumers spent more money last month, putting off fears of a recession. spending increased six tenths of a percent, that's three times what was spent in august. americans bought big ticket items like cars and computers. but, there is a flip side. and as darren gersh reports, consumers are spending faster than they save and faster than they earn. >> reporter: if americans have learned anything in the last few years, saving less and spending more is not a recipe for long run economic health, but that's what consumers were doing last month. >> wages are stagnant. people are not getting raises, people are not getting bonuses. so what's happening is that the average consumer is having to dip into her or his savings in order to keep food on the table, in order to pay mortgages, in order to pay their bills, in order to buy gasoline et cetera, and that is not sustainable. >> rep
not only take europe down, but could actually start to affect the u.s. as well. so the stakes are very high here. >> suzanne: from europe to earnings, it's a golden quarter for the golden arches and a few other big firms. what the results may suggest about the economy.. it's "nightly business report" for friday, october 21. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, everybody. susie gharib is on assignment tonight. i'm joined by suzanne pratt. suzanne, earnings and europe battled for investors attention today. stocks rallied as optimism grew ahead of this weekend's summit of european leaders. tom, several big blue chip firms reported solid results. we'll get to those numbers in a moment. but first, the market: the dow rose 267 points, the nasdaq added almost 39 and the s&p tacked on 23. trading volume, the heaviest this week. 1.1 billion shares on the big board. 2.1 bill
. >> i was one of those kids who always thought that we should know how the world works around us. can we live on earth and we don't fall through the floor and somebody should have given us an owner's manual about how the whole thing fits together and how you use it. >> woodruff: margaret warner examines the rapid rise in c.e.o. pay at the nation's biggest companies, coming amid growing protests on wall street. >> ifill: and kira kay reports on the challenges facing liberia, as the struggling democracy prepares for next week's presidential election. >> seeing what they can gain from peace to not want to go back to war. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investin
of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the struggle to put americans back to work dominated the day in congress from president obama's jobs bill, to free trade, to china's currency. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman has the story. >> reporter: the legislative future of the president's jobs plan was as murky today as the rain clouds over the capitol. last night, senate republicans blocked the democrats' version of the $450 billion bill saying it would not work, and might make things worse. the president vowed today to keep pushing, as he addressed a latino heritage event in washington. >> we wil
broadcasting. >>> welcome. i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. thousands of religious conservatives are gathering in washington this weekend for the annual values voter summit, sponsored by the family research council and others. in addition to the many activists, several lawmakers are also speaking, as are almost all of the leading republican presidential hopefuls. >>> three women share this year's nobel peace prize for their work advancing democracy and women's rights. they are ellen johnson sirleaf, the president of liberia and africa's first democratically elected female president. leymah gbowee, also liberian, honored for her work mobilizing christian and muslim women against violence and rape. and tawakul karman, a yemeni activist and journalist who helped organize anti-government protests in her country. she is the first arab woman to receive a nobel peace prize. >>> the u.s. supreme court opened its new term this week, and one of the first cases on the docket was an anti-discrimination dispute that many believe could be the most important church-state case to r
marketplace. >> washington is the government and therefore they can screw us up, and that's the simple starting point and historically the tech industry has largely ignored washington. >> woodruff: and we close with a profile of poet philip shultz and his new memoir on overcoming the challenges of dyslexia. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> i mean, where would we be without small businesses? >> we need small businesses. >> they're the ones that help drive growth. >> like electricians, mechanics, carpenters. >> they strengthen our communities. >> every year, chevron spends billions with small businesses. that goes right to the heart of local communities, providing jobs, keeping people at work. they depend on us. >> the economy depends on them. >> and we depend on them. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supportinscience, technology, an impved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by th
is building the drones -- apparently drones were used or reportedly they were used in that assassination. you know, is that producing jobs? are there drone factories in ohio? >> luckie martin -- lockheed martin -- boeing. >> there is too much pain to feel the pleasure of getting these really, really bad guys. and obama is not the type to spite of all and the end zone so there has not been much gloating over it. there has not been any -- he has not stopped to really capitalizing on it. >> let me show you a picture. wizard owner ted leonsis, at a wizard's game, on the d.c. sports blog. ted leonsis challenges the president rhetoric about the gap between the very rich and everyone else. >> i voted for the president, and that's out on donations to his reelection campaign. it blows my mind when i am asked for money as a donation and at the same time i am being blasted as the bad guy. his advice to the president is to rethink how to talk to business and sell to business leaders on your plan to make the president -- country great. many of us want to be part of the solution. we are not the problem. >>
said something? >> preacher said it absolved us. >> for him, not for the law. i'm surprised at you, pete, i gave you credit for more brains than dell her. >> but there was witnesses that seen us regimed. >> that not the issue. even if it put you square with the lord the state of miissippi is more hard nosed. >> you shoulhave joined us, everett. it wouldn't have hurt none. >> at least it would have washed away the stink of that pomade. >> youwo ignorant fools, i like that smell of my hair treatmen the pleasing odor is half the point. baptism, you two are just dumber than a bag of hammers. >> because the house always wins. play long enough, you can never change the stakes. the house takes you. unless when that perfect hand comes along you bet big and then you take the house. >> you've been practicing that speech, haven't you? >> a little bit. did i rush it? it felt li i rushed it. >> no, i liked it. >> we're going with the story th the u.s. air fce tried him without one shred of evidence and found him guilty of being a security risk. >> you have also claimed he's not a security risk
. >>> welcome, i'm bob abernethy. it's good to have you with us. >>> a new vatican document this week called for sweeping changes in the global financial system in order, it said, to put "the common good" at the center of economic activity. one of the most controversial proposals would create an international political authority that would have broad power to regulate financial markets. the document was issued by the pontifical council for justice and peace. it said changes are needed to address the quote "inequalities and distortions of capitalist development." >> meanwhile, in many cities around the world, the occupy movement continues its campaigns for economic justice. here in the u.s., religious leaders raised concerns about how some cities have been cracking down on the protests. the group faithful america launched a petition drive urging local authorities to refrain from violence. the faith community has been playing an increasingly visible role in many of the protests. kim lawton reports on some of the religious activities around occupy wall street. >> reporter: for the occupy wall s
the euro-zone will use its $610 billion bailout fund. and how to ensure the stability of european banks. the top priority is planning for a structured debt default by greece. >> i think the best we can hope for at this point is that europeans reassure markets that greece will be allowed to default in an orderly way and the greek default will not affect italy, because the european leaders will, as a second important step, take steps to backstop and support the italian government bond market. >> tom: stocks moved higher as european leaders worked towards a debt resotion. the dow rose 162 points, the nasdaq added 12 and the s&p 500 up nearly 13 points. big board volume continues above one billion shares while nasdaq volume climbed above two billion. sales of new homes were up last month following four straight monthly declines. the commerce department says sales jumped nearly 6% as builders lowered prices in a soft market. separately, another report shows companies ordered more heavy machinery and computers in september. overall demand slipped by just under 1%, but that was largely because
than 100 u.s. cities had protests on saturday. occupy wall street began as opposition to the perceived greed of large u.s. financial firms and growing wealth disparitys made worse by the recession but over the weekend it gained momentum abroad especially in europe where it dove tailed with long-running demonstrations against wage and benefit cuts recently adopted by cash-strapped european governments. in rome, throngs filled the streets near the ancient roman chros but the peaceful gathering into a riot when some in the crowd smashed windows and burned cars. police used tear gas and fire hoses to push back crowds, and officials estimated property damage at more than a million dollars. there were clashes in germany as well. as protestors marched on the parliament building in berlin. and in london where protesters were pushed away from the london stock exchange before making their way to st. paul's cathedral. wikileaks founder julian assange addressed the crowd there. >> this movement is not about the obstruction of law. it is about the construction of law. >> reporter: but today russian
, european time. because the u.s. has been quite involved, in fact n this european debate. it is, after all, a world in which we're all interconnected and interrelated. and europe's putting its house in order, something that theu.s. also cares about. and of course we also talk about our region. >> right. >> rose: . >> you know, the middle east, the ab spring, turkey, the balkans, so of course, i have to say, however, that although i'm a greek foreign minister no one particularly cares to talk about all those other things. they say well that's all very interesting. tell me about the-- . >> rose: what's going happen to is greece did going to default on its debt or not, that's t question. >> exactly. >> rose: okay so, what do you think of the deal that has been struck? >> i think it's anxcellent deal. i think that there's work to be done to make it concrete. what i mean by this is that greece was beyond any doubt now, in the eyes of the markets and of the people of europe safeguarded. >> rose: markets reacted positively but often they do after there is some solution that troubles them because
signs that a double-dip recession might not be in the offing after all. the u.s. economy grew at an annual rate of 2.5% in the third quarter, and consumer spending jumped six tenths of a percent in september. the numbers were better than expected, but there were also reminders that the recovery is still relatively weak. the world's biggest appliance maker, whirlpool, announced today it's cutting 5,000 jobs. that's about 10% of its workforce in north america and europe. it cited weak demand and higher costs for materials. meanwhile, there were also questions about just how the new european debt deal will work and who will pay for expanded bailout efforts. the head of europe's rescue fund visited beijing today, hoping to entice the chinese to invest in the multi-billion-dollar plan. he dismissed suggestions that china might demand political concessions in return. >> there's no special deal. it's the normal conditions. we publish those conditions on our web site and there is nothing specl. they find this an interesting investment. >> woodruff: in turn, the chinese vice foreign mi
research fellow at the american task force on palestine. he writes for various publications in the u.s. and middle east. daniel levy, after such a stand-off for so many years, who blinked? >> well, the same deal has really been on offer for some time. so i think the decision ultimately... more had to be taken on the israeli side. that doesn't mean that both parties didn't climb down a little bit from the ladders they were on. but i think the prime minister net netanyahu explained this in the context of the arab spring that there was a closing window forgetting such a deal done with egyptian mediation. i think that's part of the story. i think israel wanted to be a problem-solver rather than just a problem-maker. in its relationship with the new egypt. but i also think this has to be seen in the context of how israeli public opinion has shifted during the five years of gila shalit's captivity, a lot due to the work of the family. the move today was popular. it's a political win, not without risks, but a political win for netanyahu and it allows him to first of all show he can make decis
with dnainfo.com, a web site that closely covers local news in new york. we thank you both for being with us. arun to you first. you've been out there among the protestors for several days. who are they? >> well, it's a motley group of mostly young people who have come from all over the country. they've been joined by people who are not so young who have also joined them from new york city. i've met people from los angeles, from boston. they're joined i guess what they share is sort of a sense of disenfranchisement, a sense that their voices, what they call the voices of the 99% are being muted, being canceled out by the power of structure, i guess. the 1% as they call them. at the feel like corporate interests really take precedence over the voices of the masses. . they're trying to change that. >> woodruff: julie sha peer... you've been out among the protestors. tell us about some of the people you've talked to. >> i've seen a huge variety of people. you have people who are squatting in apartments in brooklyn who have lost their jobs and in danger of being evicted. college students from pe
% in alternative investments. joining us now with more analysis? charles reinhard, deputy chief investment officer at morgan stanley. hi, charlie, nice to you have on the program. >> thank you, happy columbus day. >> susie: same to you. so tell me, what change. why the asset allocation switch now? >> well, we think in the last several weeks the risk and the uncertainty have gone up. and we wanted to be in harmony with what we saw could be a bumpier road ahead. and that's why we increased the waiting to save haven assets and we lowered the weighting to different riskier assets. >> susie: so let's talk about the safe haven. you are identifying them as things like cash, investment grade bonds, short-term debt instruments. but not gold. so tell us what your definition of a safe haven is these days. >> well, you named it. these are actually different investments that when we hit bumpy times having a higher exposure to them can make the bumps feel smaller than they otherwise might be. and we felt it was prudent to increase our exposure to items like you just ticked off. cash, high quality bonds and so f
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